An experiment in which tomato seedlings are vibrated in small steps (provided by Ryukyu University)

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An experiment in which tomato seedlings are vibrated in small steps (provided by Ryukyu University)

Bemisia tabaci. The white line at the bottom right indicates the length of 1 mm (provided by Ryukyu University)

Expanding

Bemisia tabaci. The white line at the bottom right indicates the length of 1 mm (provided by Ryukyu University)

A team from Ryukyu University and the Forest Research Institute announced by the 30th that the effect of reducing pests on tomatoes was confirmed by vibrating the seedlings in small steps. It is thought that the stress caused by vibration causes pests to escape or stop mating. Professor Haruki Tateda of the team pointed out that “if used properly, the amount of pesticide sprayed can be reduced,” and aims to put the device to practical use three years later.

The pest is a tobacco whitefly with a body length of about 1 mm. It absorbs nutrients from tomato leaves and spreads the virus that kills plants. Types that are resistant to pesticides have emerged, and countermeasures have become an issue.