A mosquito that pierces human skin with a needle and sucks blood (provided by Dainihon Jochugiku)

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A mosquito that pierces human skin with a needle and sucks blood (provided by Dainihon Jochugiku)

It was found that mosquito saliva contains a component that suppresses the action of a protein that acts as a sensor for pain in human cells. Research teams such as the National Institute for Physiological Sciences (Aichi Prefecture), University of Toyama, and Kansai University (Osaka Prefecture) have published in the journal of international conferences by the 9th.

It was thought that the reason why it was hard to notice even if it was bitten by a mosquito was that the needle was very thin with a diameter of 70 micrometers, but this component may also be involved. It has been known that when sucking blood, it produces saliva that makes it difficult for blood to clot and causes itching.

Professor Makoto Tominaga of the Institute of Physiology said, “A closer look at mosquito saliva may lead to the development of new analgesics.”