The majority want to abolish short-haul flights or make them more expensive

Green Chancellor candidate Annalena Baerbock has sparked a debate with her call for short-haul flights to be abolished. In a representative survey, around a quarter of those questioned agreed with it.

A plane lands at Frankfurt Airport.

EA majority of people in Germany would like to abolish short-haul flights or at least make them more expensive. Almost one in four (24 percent) said they should be abolished in an online survey conducted by the opinion research institute YouGov on behalf of the German Press Agency. Around one in three (34 percent) would like to make short-haul flights more expensive, for example with a tax, in order to make them less attractive. Another quarter of respondents (26 percent) were against any change in short-haul flights – the rest were undecided or rejected all three options.

The designated candidate for chancellor and party leader of the Greens, Annalena Baerbock, had said in mid-May of the “Bild am Sonntag”: “Short-haul flights should no longer exist in the future.” Even cheap prices such as 29 euros for Mallorca flights should no longer exist if you have it be serious about climate policy. SPD Chancellor candidate Olaf Scholz had previously told ProSieben that he was in favor of taking action against cheap flights and setting a lower price limit. Baerbock emphasized that the rail network had to be expanded at the same time and that she did not want to ban short-haul flights.

Every second person would also answer a speed limit of 130 kilometers per hour or less: 43 percent of those questioned would be for a speed limit of 130 kilometers per hour on motorways, 7 percent for a speed limit that would be even lower. 17 percent would be in favor of a limit at a value of more than 130 kilometers per hour. Around one in four (27 percent) reject a general speed limit.

The SPD advocates a speed limit of 130 kilometers per hour in its election program, as does the Greens in their draft program, which has not yet been approved by the party congress.