The “lost” generation of stock exchanges

No generation mistrusts investments in the capital market as much as the future generation of pensioners. For many German baby boomers, stocks are “uncontrollable risks”. But there are also differences between them.

Are reluctant to deal with stocks: The 50+ generation and early retirees in Germany

Dhe Germans are many, as is well known, they are not a nation of shareholders. It is true that the continued meager interest rates have meanwhile made equity securities somewhat more attractive for some investors. Nevertheless, most German citizens almost exclusively associate the stock market with speculation. And no generation mistrusts investments in the capital market as much as the future generation of pensioners, the so-called baby boomers. These are the results of a representative survey by the French insurance group Axa in collaboration with the polling institute Yougov.

And if the Germans do own shares, then they behave differently than the renowned stock market guru André Kostolany postulated with his advice to buy the securities and just leave them lying around. Because, according to the survey, German citizens give an average of just 28 months as the optimal duration for their investments on the stock exchange. In view of the frequent price fluctuations, that is far too little, say the experts at Axa. In contrast, an average of only 12 percent of adults consider a stock market exposure longer than ten years to be the best.